Dickey Chapelle was not a White House photographer, but she was a brave war photographer.

Spend a few minutes to pull up this story in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel Dickey Chappelle  http://www.jsonline.com/news/milwaukee/legendary-war-photographer-dickey-chapelle-back-in-focus-b99371912z1-279644882.html?ipad=y

You will read about Dickey Chapelle , a brave war correspondent who photographed the battles at Iwo Jima and Okinawa.   There were many trips to photograph during the Vietnam War.  Dickey Chapelle died when a land mine exploded in Vietnam in 1965.  Please read the story and if you are in the Milwaukee area the Milwaukee Press Club Hall of Fame induction ceremony for Dickey Chapelle will be held on October 24th at the Potawatomi Hotel.  Tickets:milwaukeepressclub.org

 

 


  • To our White House. Happy Birthday!

    White House duskOn October 13th 1792, the cornerstone of the White House was laid without a ceremony.  At that time it was called the executive residence.  The sandstone was white washed and the name White House caught on about 1811.   After a day’s work, there is nothing like looking back over your shoulder as you are walking out of the photographers area and seeing the North Portico at dusk.


  • Ninety-five years ago President Wilson suffered a stroke and vanished from months.

    Wilson Joe RobertsSevere headaches forced President Woodrow Wilson return to the White House in the middle of  a nationwide tour to promote the ratification of the League of Nations Treaty. On October 2, 1919, the president suffered a massive, debilitating stroke—not that the public knew about it.

    The rush of doctors and medical equipment to the White House alerted the press that Wilson had a major health problem. Few knew the status of the president’s illness. The first lady, Edith Wilson, and Dr. Cary T. Grayson, Wilson’s physician, friend, and adviser, were not talking.

    Woodrow WilsonFor months it was a mystery: Just who was running the country? The news photographers in Washington were feeling great pressure from their editors to get a photograph of Wilson.

    As   Wilson   recovered  slightly that summer of 1920, White House officials called on photographer George Harris to make a photograph of the president at work to prove to the nation that he could perform his presidential duties. The man who actually took the picture was Buck May who worked for Harris & Ewing.  The situation was highly controlled by Mrs. Wilson. Close examination of the photograph shows that the first lady had to assist the president because his paralyzed arm could not steady the document.

    The pressure for additional views of Wilson continued. The photographers gathered outside the White House gates to make pictures of the president and first lady during their afternoon automobile rides. Everyone looked at the photographs and realized that their president was a very sick man.

     

     


  • The White House News Photographers Association Report September 2014

    The first issue of a digital newsletter using ISSUU format.  Take a look!

    ISSU Septhttp://issuu.com/bluerover/docs/whnpa_report_sept_2014a_300dpi


  • Passed Presidents —Every Presidential Gravesite in the United States

    The Grave of President William Henry Harrison

    The Gravesite of President William Henry Harrison

    Many photographers visit state capitals, races, even structures with scaffolds, Ted Ringger, has photographed all of those venues and one more—a big one more.  Ringger has visited and photographed the gravesites of every deceased president of the Untied States.  When you think about it, that’s quite an accomplishment.  He even added Jefferson Davis to his visual collection.

    Ringger’s website : http://imagesandmore.blogspot.com is worth viewing.  Ringger provides information about each president’s life and a little about their final resting places.  Definitely a unique and different history.

    President Zachary Taylor's Grave in Louisville, KY

    President Zachary Taylor’s Grave in Louisville, KY


  • The News Photographers and Pictures of FDR in his Wheelchair

    FDR in his wheelchair at the FDR Memorial in Washington, DC

    FDR in his wheelchair at the FDR Memorial in Washington, DC

    The rules for photographers at the White House were clear: No pictures of the president in leg braces, on crutches, or in a wheelchair, and no pictures of the president getting into or out of a vehicle, which highlighted his paralysis and need for assistance. “You follow the rules,” Early assured them, “you’ll get your pictures.” Not only was Early’s pitch on behalf of Roosevelt not new, it followed four years of limited access to Hoover. “So the photographers agreed to his request,” Photographer George Tames said, “but something happened. Within two or three years, what had been a request had the effect of law.” The photographers at the White House honored the rules— they even kept each other in line. “If, as it happened once or twice,  one of its members sought to violate it and try to sneak a picture of the president in his chair,” historian Hugh Gregory Gallagher wrote, “one or another of the older photographers would ‘accidentally’ knock the camera to the ground or otherwise block the picture.” None of the photographers who covered the Roosevelt White House interviewed for this book recalled a photographer even attempting to make a photograph of Roosevelt in his wheelchair. It just was not done. “I asked once to see a copy of the rules,” George Tames wrote in a memoir, “and was informed by one of the older hands that if I wanted to be a wiseass who didn’t follow the rules, then they would see that I never made a picture around the White House again.”

    One exception of a press photographer trying to make a picture of Roosevelt in his wheelchair was Life magazine’s George Skadding. He had been the Associated Press photographer covering the White House for years before joining the Life staff. His editors wanted to run a photograph of Roosevelt being carried by an aide and gave the awkward assignment to Skadding. He tried many ways, using short and long lenses, and did get a picture. Early’s office threatened to pull his press credentials.

    The Roosevelts and the reporters and photographers at Campobello

    The Roosevelts and the reporters and photographers at Campobello


  • President Theodore Roosevelt and photographer George Harris

    A portrait of President Theodore Roosevelt made by George Harris, Harris & Ewing, Library of Congress

    A portrait of President Theodore Roosevelt made by George Harris, Harris & Ewing, Library of Congress

    Theodore Roosevelt was not shy about offering advice to  anyone.  When photographer George Harris said that he was not sure that he could take a photograph of the  president’s cabinet in a tiny, dark room of the White House, Roosevelt roared: “Mr. Harris, I’m amazed. That’s no kind of answer. When anybody asks if you can do anything in photography, tell them, ‘Certainly I can.’ Then find a way to do it.” Harris found a way to make  the photograph and he did an excellent job.  You have often seen the credit Harris & Ewing in the tiny photo credits in history and text books.  George Harris’s company was a major contributor to the photographic history of the first half of the last century.

    The picture of the Roosevelt cabin made by George Harris, Harris & Ewing, Library of congress

    The picture of the Roosevelt cabin made by George Harris, Harris & Ewing, Library of congress


  • Charles Dharapak named Asia Pacific Photo Editor for the Associated Press

    AP photographer Charles Dharapak walks and talks to Secretary of State John Kerry about his past assignments in Gaza in a hotel in Cairo, Egypt, July 24, 2014. Dharapak was on a one week assignment in the Middle East with Kerry as he traveled to Cairo, Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Ramallah, and Paris as a cease fire to fighting in Gaza between between Hamas and Israel was being negotiated. Photo: Glen Johnson.

    AP photographer Charles Dharapak walks and talks to Secretary of State John Kerry about his past assignments in Gaza in a hotel in Cairo, Egypt, July 24, 2014. Dharapak was on a one week assignment in the Middle East with Kerry as he traveled to Cairo, Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Ramallah, and Paris as a cease fire to fighting in Gaza between between Hamas and Israel was being negotiated. Photo: Glen Johnson.

    One of the neat things about the White House Press Photographers is the fact that you are working with men and women who are the very top of the profession of photojournalism. Charles Dharapak is a great example of the very best.  Charles Dharapak began his career with the Associated Press in 1993 in Southeast Asia and earned his stripes covering the Cambodian Civil War, the fall of Suharto and a myriad  of nasty conflicts and protests. In 2002 Dharapak and his cameras  were in the middle of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.  In 2003 he was transferred to the AP Washington bureau.  Political campaigns, Presidential trips, and major news stories were part of his Washington work.  In 2012 he was named Photographer of the Year by the White House News Photographers Association.

    Some White House news photographers come to Washington, DC and stay to the end of their careers.  Others move on to higher positions in their career.  Although this is a change into management for Dharapak, you know you will continue to find his photographs on the front pages of newspapers around the world in the future.

    As one White House news photographer i will say that I am truly sorry to see him leave Washington DC. His hard work for the White House News Photographers Association will be missed, but you can’t keep a good man down.  Good luck Charlie.


  • Pebble Beach get a New Sleek Green Look

    Photo by Dennis Brack It started with television reporters doing stand ups  in the grass on the North Lawn.  At the last on the Clinton years, the position was  temporarily  moved across the driveway while Department of Interior contractors filled the area with large Pebbles and the area got it’s name.  First Lady Laura Bush wanted to make that area more attractive and once again temporary move and concrete was poured.  The simple lights, cameras, and tripods have evolved to sophisticated  sound stages.  Last week matching green canvas covers on the top of well made iron structures have given the area a uniform professional look. The look has changed, but Pebble Beach is still a nice place to hangout on a nice September day.  Photo by Dennis Brack


  • Dorothea Lange Special

    Dorothea LangeThe program made by Dorothea Lange’s daughter shows the life of a determined photographer.  As a photographer it was interesting seeing the selection of the great photographs out of series of near misses.  It is a long program but worth your time.

    http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/episodes/dorothea-lange/watch-full-film-dorothea-lange-grab-a-hunk-of-lightning/3260/