Republican Conventions: A combination of political excitement and sometimes predictable boredom.

A balloon drop at the Republican Convention in New Orleans in 1988. Photograph by Dennis Brack bb33
A balloon drop at the Republican Convention in New Orleans in 1988.
Photograph by Dennis Brack bb33

The Republican Conventions for the past  fifty years have been a combination of political excitement  and sometimes predictable boredom.  The photographers covering the White House are usually in the key positions to cover these events.  For years the center stand position for the Associated Press was manned by Pulitzer Prize winner Ron Edmonds. 

The Center Camera Stand during the Democratic Convention in New York in 1980 Photograph by Dennis Brack bs b 17
The Center Camera Stand during the Democratic Convention in New York in 1980
Photograph by Dennis Brack bs b 17

This year Scotty Applewhite will be on the AP  center stand and no doubt there will be hundreds of photographs with the credit J. Scott Applewhite, AP.

For the last two days photographers have been busy mounting remote cameras on poles to the side and behind the speakers.  Cameras are also positioned on the catwalks overhead to  get  new overall photographs.  These remotes have come a long way.  The Canon camera loans their latest remote cameras that will zoom and pan to various wire services. 

 Richard Nixon and Spiro Agnew at the Republican Convention in 1972 PHOTO BY DENNIS BRACK B 5

Richard Nixon and Spiro Agnew at the Republican Convention in 1972
PHOTO BY DENNIS BRACK B 5

Sometimes the excitement comes from the selection of the vice presidential nominee.  In 1968 outside of Maryland, nobody had ever heard of Spiro Agnew. 

Vice President candidate Dan Quayle speaks as candidate Vice President HW Bush watches at a rally the day after the Republican Convention in August 1988. This photograph was the cover of TIME magazine that week. Photograph by Dennis Brack bb 27
Vice President candidate Dan Quayle speaks as candidate Vice President HW Bush watches at a rally the day after the Republican Convention in August 1988. This photograph was the cover of TIME magazine that week.
Photograph by Dennis Brack bb 27

Likewise in New Orleans, we were are lined up and waiting for a Mississippi paddlewheel  to dock so that we could find a fellow named Dan Qualye.

 Nixon supporter at the Republican national Convention in 1972 Photo by Dennis Brack b11

Nixon supporter at the Republican national Convention in 1972
Photo by Dennis Brack b11

Regardless of the news value, the Republican Conventions are a good show.

W Clemment Stone at Republican Convention in 1972 PHOTO BY DENNIS BRACK B 5
W Clemment Stone at Republican Convention in 1972
PHOTO BY DENNIS BRACK B 5

Millionaires like W. Clement Stone arrive in their million dollar yachts.  There usually  is no shortage of beautiful ladies.

Of course,  there are folks that are there to protest and that is a major part of the  convention story.

Often there are Republicans who the  Republican leadership would like to forget.  When asked why Sarah Palin was not speaking at the convention, Trump relied  “It’s a little bit difficult because of where she is. We love Sarah. Little bit difficult because of, you know, it’s a long ways away.”

Often they bring back their heroes. 

 President George W. Bush talks with his father after the president's speech to the Republican National Convention in New York, NY on September 2, 2004. Photograph by Dennis Brack

President George W. Bush talks with his father after the president’s speech to the Republican National Convention in New York, NY on September 2, 2004. Photograph by Dennis Brack

The convention loved Bush 41 and Bush 43 on the  floor together in New York 2004.

No heroes are coming to Cleveland for this week’s convention.  The action will most likely take place on the streets. 

Demonstration during the 1972 Republican Convention PHOTO BY DENNIS BRACK B 5
Demonstration during the 1972 Republican Convention
PHOTO BY DENNIS BRACK B 5