Reviews

Title: Review

Link: www.purepolitics.com

Outlet: www.purepolitics.com

Hard to imagine we lived in a time without instragram or social media where a digital image captured a moment in time. In Presidential Pictures by Dennis Brack you get a small glimpse of past presidents.  Accompanying the photos there are some interesting text explaining the context of the photographs. 

I especially liked the ones that were candid, the ones that were not necessary meant to be taken.

The end of the book has some unsung heroes of the photo press corps that have captured some historic moments.

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Cassandra Graham has just completed a review of Presidential Picture Stories

—Very interest take on the presidential office. The stories you never heard were intriguing and the pictures were very telling and revealing. If your a history buff and you like presidential history you’ll definitely like this book.

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Outlet: Unknown:

This is a fun book to read.  This wonderful book provides insights to the lives of both the Presidents and those who work with them in a way practically nobody sees. Book Facts:  Presidential Pictures by Dennis Brack

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Review by Liz Brack, author of ME & EMMA, (New York Times best sellers list), EVERYTHING MUST GO, SLEEPWALKING IN DAYLIGHT and WHAT HAPPENED TO MY SISTER. These books are under the name of Liz Flock. http://elizabethflock.com/books/

I just finished PPS and I have one word for you:      WOW!!!    It’s fantastic! I learned so much not only about photography but about presidential history (which is, I assume, the point) and I am filled with renewed admiration and respect for you. INCREDIBLE. I can’t imagine the research that went into this… whatever the amount of time, it was worth it. Fascinating stories, all.

I must say that Liz Brack is my niece.

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Cassandra Graham has just completed a review of Presidential Picture Storieshttps://www.netgalley.com/publisher/reviewerDetails?

Very interesting take on the presidential office. The stories you never heard were intriguing and the pictures were very telling and revealing. If your a history buff and you like presidential history you’ll definitely like this book

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Howard Silvers  wrote: “Two great photography books to be released, David Turnley and Dennis Dennis Brack. I am so proud to have so many photographers for my Facebook friends. It feels like I am back selling at the camera store(four decades)”

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Link: http://wakela.wordpress.com/2013/11/28/presidential-picture-stories/

Outlet: Wakela’s World

Disclaimer:  I received this book free from Brack Books in exchange for an honest review.  I did not receive any form of compensation.

 

Whether you are love history or a photography buff, this book is definitely one to pick up and cherish.

This book takes a look at the White House photographers throughout the years.  Many of them have taken photographs that will always be burned in our brains as part of US history and culture.  Everyone has seen the iconic picture of Abraham Lincoln that was taken by Matthew Brady.  However, did you know that during the civil war, Brady was out in the thick of the battles with his “mobile” dark room and his camera attempting to capture that part of history on film.  Not only was he doing this, but Lincoln basically gave Brady the first ever press pass.  This is just one example of behind the scenes history that you will learn while reading this book.  And let’s not forget being able to see memorable pictures of each presidency since then.   It seems that many of the photographers had spent so much time with the presidents back in the earlier days that they seemed to have created an unlikely friendship.  In fact, there is a picture of FDR with a birthday cake from the White House photographers of his time.

I learned quite a bit about our history through the eyes of the White House photographers.

—————————————————————————————————-joyce chaplin has just completed a review of Presidential Picture Stories

Absolutely loved it . Agreat book of non-fiction.

Thank you,

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Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

 

Full Text: Book Review: “Presidential Picture Stories: Behind the Cameras at the White House” by Dennis Brack

These days, anyone with a smartphone can take photos of an event and immediately upload them to the internet for the rest of the world to see. We’ve become used to it and today we expect instant information that is constantly updated so we’re always up to the moment.

 

But it wasn’t always like that. People didn’t walk around with a camera in their pocket to capture and preserve a single moment for all time. That was (and really, still is) the job of a photojournalist – to take photos that tell a story and make us feel a part of the news.

This book gives a glimpse into the lives of the photographers who have covered the White House, the stories they can tell, and the photographs they took. There are formal posed photos of Presidents and candid shots taken unexpectedly. There are the iconic photos that defined an event, such as Cecil Stoughton’s photograph of Johnson taking the oath of office while Jacqueline Kennedy stands by his side or Stan Stern’s photo of John saluting his father’s passing casket. There are candid shots of President Ford swimming in the White House pool and one of President Carter slipping on the ice the first time he headed for the Oval Office – which apparently began a feud between Carter and the press! And there are stories, many stories. Stories about the Presidents and the photographers who covered them. Stories about the life of the photographers before, during, and after their time covering the White House. This book is amazingly captivating and almost impossible to put down!

Ellen Cohn (Educator)

 

A review by

Lesley Mumbray-Williams

Link: http://leem-w.blogspot.co.uk/2013/10/white-house-history.htm

White House history

Having passions both for photography and for the history of the USA, I thought I’d blog today about two recent reads which link these themes.  The first is Presidential Picture Stories: behind the cameras at the White House by Dennis Brack and the second is The Hidden White House: Harry Truman and the reconstruction of America’s most famous residence by Robert Klara.Both of these tell fascinating stories.  The first is about the long history of the relationship between the media and the power of the presidency, from the earliest days of the published images of Lincoln to the present day.  There are facts and anecdotes about many of the most important moments of American history: during two world wars, plus Korea and Vietnam, the assassination of JFK and the quick wits of the stills photographer who asked a policeman where the speeding motorcade was taking the mortally wounded President and was able to reach Parkland Hospital, the way in which the press respected FDR’s wish not to be depicted as vulnerable as a result of his polio.  There were also occasional sneaky tricks and practical jokes such as the photographer who developed two rolls of precious images and had the shock of finding the film blank – because colleagues had replaced his exposed film rolls with unexposed ones – and the canny photographer who bided his time in photocalls until all the others had used their allocation of film and time before calling out a question or two and snapping the candid shots that others missed.Truman had a good relationship with the media and Jim Atherton, a United Press photographer, is quoted in the first book as saying “Covering Truman was like covering your best friend’s father”.
A Review from Lis Carey
Dennis Brack, a White House photographer himself, gives us a very readable short history of the photographers who have worked the White House beat, from Woodrow Wilson to Barack Obama. We get engaging stories about the photographers, the presidents, their interactions. It was Teddy Roosevelt who first moved the photographers from the street to the first improvised photographers’ room in the White House. We see that working space for the photographers and reporters evolving over the decades, because of the changing technology, needs, and numbers of the working press. Each of the photographers brought their own personality and backgrounds to the job of photographing the President, his official activities, and his family, and each President brought his own personality and needs to their interactions. Some liked the photographers, some did not. Some were considerate, others not. FDR was a natural for the camera, but also needed to conceal the truth of the crippling effects of polio on his body. Lyndon Johnson was friendly, but also demanding, capricious, and never gave any thought to the effect of long hours and unannounced trips on the photographers who had to cover him. Truman was a friend of the photographers for years, as Senator and Vice President, before he became President. George H. W. Bush was a real friend of many of the reporters; his son, George W. Bush, friendly but more distant.

There are many entertaining or moving stories here, the experiences of the photographers, and the important, historic moments that produced iconic pictures. A few of the stories strike truly odd and uncomfortable notes. The most off-putting for me was a story he says may be apocryphal–so why tell it? It’s the story of a photographer who covered the White House but also did other features. He visited a certain woman to take pictures of her, in her twelfth floor apartment. She had a “yippy little dog,” and while she was out of the room, he threw a ball for the dog–threw it to the balcony, where it rolled off under the balcony railing, followed in close pursuit by the dog. This is apparently supposed to be a funny story. Yet we know that the “yippy little dog,” if this story ever happened, would have died from that fall. For the crime of being “yippy.” What the heck is wrong with the person who thinks this story is funny?

And among all these Presidents, most of whom had dogs, we get only glimpses, for instance one brief mention of one of LBJ’s beagles, and the picture of him pulling that dog up by his ears. For the most part, you’d never know the Presidents had dogs, no matter how famous the dogs were. No mention of FDR’s Fala, Bush 41’s Millie, Bush 43’s Barney and Mrs. Beasley, Obama’s Bo. How does a book about White House photography not mention these much-photographed dogs?

Up through Reagan, the Presidents mostly get a chapter each, but after that, it’s much more compact and hitting the highlights of photographing the last twenty years or so of Presidents. This is followed by brief bios of some of the most famous, significant, or interesting of the photographers, and then the history of their tools, the technology of photography.

Overall, an interesting read with a few odd, off-putting notes.   I received a free electronic galley of this book from the publisher via NetGalley.

Melissa Beasley (Reviewer) has just shared feedback for Presidential Picture Stories.

This book is great for any history buff that wants to know more about the presidents. This book will give you a lot of insight and knowledge into what they were like on a day to day level instead of just what you imagine they are like from the news.  It was very interesting to see how much some presidents interacted with the photographers and even going as far as building a “home” for them in the White House. Then it showed how some presidents were weary and the photographers started changing how many pictures and if they were even allowed.

Link: http://thenewmodernhousewife.blogspot.com/2013/10/presidential-pictures-and-stories.html

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Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

I love photography myself and am a bit of a history buff so I thought I would check this book out. I really enjoyed it a lot. It was very cool to see the pictures as well as to read some of the stories behind the pictures. Overall it’s a very great book and I really enjoyed it.

Member Email: parishiltonrocks@gmail.com

Sir. Well done!

You have done a great service to your colleagues, and provided the rest of us with insightful glimpses into this particular subset of humanity, as well as providing a survey of the profession across the decades in a narrative sweep that is, to my mind, nicely organized. There are some wonderfully hilarious stories in there, which is as it should be. History need not be dry, and yours is not.

Pat Hinley        11/18/13  PHinely@wlu.edu

Amelia Rodriguez (Librarian) has just shared feedback for Presidential Picture Stories.
Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Additional Questions:   Is your library likely to purchase this title? YES

Amazon Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars

Well Written, Historic, Amazing Look At Presidents Past And Present…, January 13, 2014

By JP “J.P.”See all my reviews

(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

Presidential Picture Stories is 222 pages with a source list and index in the back. The book features great stories and both black and white, and color photographs. This book is easy to read in an afternoon, though most of a readers time will be spent looking at and viewing the pictures throughout.

Capturing American Presidents from Lincoln forward, the book has great information and wonderful stories from life in the White House. The first president to get his own chapter is Roosevelt (FDR), and each president forward has their own chapter excluding Regan and H.W. Bush who share a chapter, and likewise Clinton, W. Bush and Obama also share a chapter.

This tome captures a beautiful history of the American Presidency, in a way most have not seen or thought about. Photographs of presidents, although extremely common today, were treasured works back in the day for news and insight into the White House and the President of our country. Brack does a wonderful job capturing the stories of those who took many of the pictures we know of today from presidents past. He also gives us a deeper look at what it took to get those ‘perfect shots’ as we know them today, through the collections of stories and photographs he has gotten over the years from the sources. As you make your way through the book, the photos are mostly black and white, and as you get closer to the end, they become more color than black and white. A soft reminder of how far we’ve come in journalism and documenting history.

This book, Presidential Picture Stories, is a wonderful read for anyone who loves history or takes a great interest in US History and Government. I have found it to be an easy read and really well presented.

Disclosure: I want you to know I received a Review Copy from the Publisher for the purposes of providing this review. However, a review in exchange for the Review Copy was not promised. The views and opinions expressed in this review are my own, and in no way represent the views or opinions of the Author or Publisher.

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GREAT PHOTOGRAPHERS, GREAT PICTURES!, December 17, 2013

By Khamneithang Vaiphei “A good life is a collec…See all my reviews

(TOP 500 REVIEWER)

Presidential Picture Stories: Behind the Cameras at the White House by Dennis Brack is a book you’d cherish if you are a lover of history and photography.

Dennis Brack has done a commendable job in capturing the people behind the lens at the White House throughout the years. One thing that will immediately strike you is the renewed mind with which you view history. Many wordsmiths have painted glorious pictures of the presidents, but these imaginative and creative photographers have captured the presidents in a far more telling portrayal that will be etched in memory for a long, long time to come.

And one must never forget the fact that these photographers work under difficult and different circumstances. It is good to get to know the men behind the photographs of the presidents from Woodrow Wilson to Barack Obama. Through the book you’ll get to see some iconic pictures, and the men behind them. Getting to know them makes the still pictures come alive!

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5.0 out of 5 stars

History through a new lens, March 17, 2014

By  Nancy A Russell (Cooperstown, NY United States) – See all my reviews

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This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

I greatly enjoyed Mr. Brack’s book. It covered many bases from the history of photography, to the advent of photojournalism and innovations along the way. It provided insight into many political figures, behind the scenes, which at times varied from the image projected in the news. Mr. Brack’s stories were entertaining as well as informative. It is amazing to think of how difficult capturing a picture, much less a good one, could be. The weight of the equipment plus the limited ability to photograph seems so foreign in today’s world. Mr. Brack should be commended on his book, as well as memorializing an important part of our history.

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5.0 out of 5 stars

How to Truely Picture History, March 10, 2014

By  Lady Vampire “~LadyVampire~” (Chicago, Il. USA) – See all my reviews

This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

Okay listen up all you would be historians, camera bugs and just plain curious people. This book takes you on a truly working journal, decade by decade of US presidents and the men who give us insight to them by way of the camera. This book highlights the funny episodes connected with the powerful men who run this nation, along side with the photos hounds that seek to capture that one great moment on film. Well written with laugh out loud moments, this book has it all along with a totally new appreciation of the men who are the White House photographers. Dennis Brack gives us the inside look into our US presidents through the lens of camera in a way that no one has before.

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5.0 out of 5 stars

The insider’s insider view of the White House, February 24, 2014

By  Lolly Anderson (Oklahoma City) – See all my reviews

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This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

Love this book! so interesting- part history lesson part human interest stories about one of the most powerful places in the world! Lolly Anderson

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4.0 out of 5 stars    Insider look at White House press photography, February 22, 2014

By  Carl FleischhauerSee all my reviews

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This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

Dennis Brack is a genuine insider — he has photographed the chief executives from Kennedy forward — but his account reaches back to the relationships earlier photographers had with such presidents as Hoover, Nixon, and Eisenhower. As an active member of the White House News Photographers Association (and one-time president of the group), he combined his own accounts with ones he has collected from colleagues and gathered up from stories of past encounters. All nicely illustrated with photos, natch, the book conveys the textures of the relationships. For people (including scholars) who are assessing the larger question of how journalists relate to the executive branch, this book will provide good material to consider and build upon.

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5.0 out of 5 stars

An interesting and frequently humorous insider’s look at White House photography, February 10, 2014

By  Margaret Picky (NYC) – See all my reviews

(TOP 500 REVIEWER)

This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

“Presidential Picture Stories” is an entertaining history of White House photography, from Matthew Brady to digital cameras. The primary topics are the stories surrounding some of the most famous presidential photographs; anecdotes about the White House photographers, the Presidents and First Ladies, and the photography and photographers; profiles of some of the photographers themselves; and the technology.

Many of the included photographs and photographers are familiar, to one degree or another. The anecdotes range from interesting to fascinating and many of them are quite humorous. The author has fifty years of experience photographing ten administrations, so this is definitely an insider’s view.

Very highly recommended.

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5.0 out of 5 stars

Something for everyone, February 6, 2014

By  John G. TsolakosSee all my reviews

This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

Presidential Picture Stories has something for almost everyone. Like Politics? Read about the Presidents with an insiders view. Like photograph? Plenty of info about the history of photography. Like history? This book goes in depth into the people who achieved the photographs that are our classics of today. Just like reading a good book? Easy to read with interesting pictures throughout.

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5.0 out of 5 stars

Read the book and learn the history of the history you were shown in the news., February 5, 2014

By  M. ODELL (Oakton, VA United States) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)

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This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

The media depiction of professional photographers is seldom particularly kind, but as Dennis Brack and his book both demonstrate, the real pros from the news tradition are a very different breed. They don’t travel with an entourage, they know the art, craft and science of photography in their soul, they will get tired and dirty and willingly go into harms way to get the story, and they have a singular gift for capturing that instant that tells not just the story, but the story behind the story as well.

I have had the pleasure of being the object of Mr. Brack’s handiwork and he is as good-natured and humble as he is brilliant. He is revered by his peers for good reason; his career’s work has been a benchmark that others aspire to. And it is utterly characteristic of the man that his memoir is told by introducing us to his comrades-in-arms in that most specialized branch of photojournalism, recording the Presidency of the United States of America. Few have done it, and very few have done it as well as Dennis Brack.

Read the book and learn the history of the history you were shown in the news.

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5.0 out of 5 stars

A Fascinating Inside Look, January 16, 2014

By  Alan FernSee all my reviews

This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

The challenges and adventures of White House photographic coverage are narrated here in the photographers’ own words. The author/editor also describes how covering the White House has changed over the years — a story I cannot recall being told in any other single book. I found it compelling reading, and thought the selection of illustrations was first-rate.

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5.0 out of 5 stars

The Inside Scoop from Both Sides of the Camera, January 9, 2014

By Susan Flett SwiderskiSee all my reviews

This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

A great photograph truly is worth a thousand words. For example, who can forget the photos of John-John Kennedy playing under the presidential desk, or saluting his father’s casket? Those images, and many many others, are etched into our collective consciousness, and they preserve vital parts of our history. In a way, they’re part of us… but what do we really know about those pictures, other than what we see in them?

Would you like to know more? Yeah? Then “Presidential Picture Stories” is the book for you.

In this book, long-time White House photojournalist Brack provides background information and captivating anecdotes about the circumstances behind some iconic photos, and about the talented photographers who took them. His inside stories give readers tantalizing glimpses of U.S. Presidents ranging from Wilson through Obama, and describe their relationships (or lack thereof) with the pool of photographers assigned to cover them.

This is a quick read, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. If you’re a history buff, have an interest in photography, or are just plain curious about the men who’ve served in the Oval Office, you’ll enjoy it, too. My only regret is that the book isn’t bigger… with enlarged photographs. It would have made a terrific coffee table book.

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5.0 out of 5 stars

The Stories Behind Amazing Photos and Photographers, December 26, 2013

By Amazon Customer “Bookaholic” (Florida) – See all my reviews

This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

These days, anyone with a smartphone can take photos of an event and immediately upload them to the internet for the rest of the world to see. We’ve become used to it and today we expect instant information that is constantly updated so we’re always up to the moment.

But it wasn’t always like that. People didn’t walk around with a camera in their pocket to capture and preserve a single moment for all time. That was (and really, still is) the job of a photojournalist – to take photos that tell a story and make us feel a part of the news.

This book gives a glimpse into the lives of the photographers who have covered the White House, the stories they can tell, and the photographs they took. There are formal posed photos of Presidents and candid shots taken unexpectedly. There are the iconic photos that defined an event, such as Cecil Stoughton’s photograph of Johnson taking the oath of office while Jacqueline Kennedy stands by his side or Stan Stern’s photo of John saluting his father’s passing casket. There are candid shots of President Ford swimming in the White House pool and one of President Carter slipping on the ice the first time he headed for the Oval Office – which apparently began a feud between Carter and the press! And there are stories, many stories. Stories about the Presidents and the photographers who covered them. Stories about the life of the photographers before, during, and after their time covering the White House. This book is amazingly captivating and almost impossible to put down!

Disclaimer: I got a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.

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5.0 out of 5 stars

A brilliant portrait of the Presidency and media coverage, December 22, 2013

By L. Mumbray-Williams “LeeMW” (UK) – See all my reviews

(REAL NAME)

This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

This fascinating book is a vivid description of the relationship between the media and the power of the presidency, from the earliest days of the published images of Lincoln to the present day. There are facts and anecdotes about many of the most important moments of American history: during two world wars, plus Korea and Vietnam, the assassination of JFK and the quick wits of the stills photographer who asked a policeman where the speeding motorcade was taking the mortally wounded President and was able to reach Parkland Hospital, the way in which the press respected FDR’s wish not to be depicted as vulnerable as a result of his polio. There were also occasional sneaky tricks and practical jokes such as the photographer who developed two rolls of precious images and had the shock of finding the film blank – because colleagues had replaced his exposed film rolls with unexposed ones – and the canny photographer who bided his time in photocalls until all the others had used their allocation of film and time before calling out a question or two and snapping the candid shots that others missed.

The book is vividly written, with wonderful anecdotes and insights, and as an English reader who is fascinated by American history and politics I thoroughly enjoyed Dennis Brack’s insights into the (surprisingly) long history of the relationship between presidential power and the media. Buy and enjoy!

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5.0 out of 5 stars

Great Stories of Great Photos and Photographers, December 20, 2013

By  Sgt FlynnSee all my reviews

This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

Dennis Brack, himself a highly respected Washington news photographer, has authored a fascinating book that traces those who have photographed the Presidents of the United States. Filled with excellent photographs and even better stories, he profiles the various presidents from Woodrow Wilson to Obama through the eyes of those who photographed them daily. For presidential historians, Brack’s book is filled with anecdotes that show the behind-the-scenes interaction of the presidents and their photographers. For the photo buff, there is a section on the equipment used from the heavy, bulky Graphics to today’s digital cameras, and everything in between, including specially modified Rolies and others to make them fast for the sometimes fleeting shot-of-a-lifetime. There is also touching and intimant details of the Kennedy assassination in Dallas and how Army photographer the late Cecil Stoughton covered Johnson’s swearing in on Air Force One.

A great book about great people and those who bring them to the public!

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4.0 out of 5 stars

Pictures are just the beginning!, December 17, 2013

By Wesley LabahnSee all my reviews

This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

The first president that had to deal with photographers was Woodrow Wilson. Photographers weren’t generally allowed on WH property, making presidential pictures a rare get. This was the case even more after Wilson had a stroke and no one was really quite sure who was running the country, since no one had seen him for so long. (This is a whole different interesting presidential story that is worth a google). 2 photographers tried to get pictures of Wilson by hiding in the wagon load of hay that was brought onto the South Law of the WH for the sheep that grazed there.No luck!

Harding was the president to give photographers some access to the WH. He appreciated a good human interest story, and used the camera men to help bring some good light on a somewhat scandalous presidency.Coolidge understood the value of the newsreel and of the photo. He was a good subject to photograph and cooperated with the photographers request. He also loved movies, and thought they were a good way to get current news events in front of the common man.My favorite story about Hoover is that Mrs Hoover didn’t like close up pictures of her husband. He wore these collars that stuck up really high and gave him a double chin. What a gal!

When I tell these stories and I say that someone was liked or disliked I mean as a photography subject and as a person you have to interact with, as a human being. It doesn’t mean they were liked/disliked due to policy, party, etc etc.-

One of my favorite stories is about FDR. He made an agreement with the press (starting when he was campaigning for governor of New York) that there was to be no photos of him looking crippled or helpless, because of his paralysis due to polio. This means no pictures of him: getting in and out of cars, being lifted in or out of anything, none showing crutches or leg braces. As long as the photogs followed these rules he was a pretty willing subject.(Can you imagine trying to make this deal today? Thank goodness there was no TMZ back then).

The stories go on. Truman was friendly and appreciative,Ike got a clock dropped on his head by a photographer and the photographer was sure he’d just “brained” the president (he didn’t it was ok). The negative for the famous “taken from the back, Kennedy leaning on his desk reading something” picture was safely stocked in the photographers “lost sock” drawer at home.LBJ was a crazy person/sonofabitch. (The more I learn about him the more I can’t believe that he was president).

One of my favorite stories about a group of WH photographers came from Nixon’s trip to India. he photographers were banished to the bed of a farmer’s truck which made for a long hot uncomfortable ride.They were so hot and thirsty that when they got to their destination they were desperate for some water. They found a servant carrying a tray of glasses and a bowl of water. The water looked kind of gross but they were desperate and, hey it’s India what can you do? They found out later that the water had just been used to rinse out cups for ice cream. Those crazy Americans!

Ford was a breath of fresh air after some of his predecessors,Carter was almost universally disliked, Regan and Bush I were almost universally liked,Clinton was distant unless you were from TIME, photogs liked that Bush II didn’t ever stay out late and he was punctual,and there was a bit of a rift between Obama and the WH photographers.

The stories about the presidents was probably my favorite part of the book, but the photographer biographies were interesting too.The story about Shelley Fielman being sent to cover the Kennedy assassination is pretty entertaining (the assassination wasn’t entertaining, his difficulties getting there/with his equipment were). Then the book ends with some camera history and what they do and what makes them important.

I thought this book was really interesting, and I’m really glad that I got a chance to review it. If Harding or Wilson could see the kind of access that photographers were given at the WH they would probably lose their minds. The pictures throughout the book are very enjoyable too. A great book if you like: American history, politics, photography, Washington DC, presidential history, and getting the inside scoop on a place people rarely get to see. I give it 3.5 stars out of 5!

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5.0 out of 5 stars

A unique perspective from a voice of experience who has a sense of humor, December 17, 2013

By  Dick Dienstag (Lex VA USA) – See all my reviews

This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

Brack has worked as a Washington photographer since the days of JFK, so he knows whereof he speaks, and he speaks well for his colleagues, whom he renders quite wonderfully human. There are some poignant stories in this book, and some hilarious ones as well, which is as it should be. History need not be dry, and this is not.

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5.0 out of 5 stars

Highly recommended as a fun and informative read., December 16, 2013

By  David KleberSee all my reviews

This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

Very interesting and engaging book. Great insider view of White House presidential photo coverage. Little known stories of the interaction of different presidents with press photographers.

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5.0 out of 5 stars

PICTURE PERFECT!!, January 6, 2014

By  MaryEvelynSee all my reviews

This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

Dennis Brack has done a fabulous job in capturing the behind the scene stories and immense history that is the White House and it’s inhabitants. The book is packaged well with wonderful pictures that REALLy DO have a story to tell. Of course, it’s not just about the pictures. Brack has included the full history of his pictures. I will continue to enjoy this one and will pass it on to my father. Thanks, Dennis Brack!!

Dennis Brack is a White House photographer and a member of the White House ISP pool which travels with the President in Washington. He is a 2012 Lifetime Achievement Award Winner. The Dennis Brack Photographic Archive spans the last five decades and includes more than 150,000 slides of U.S. presidents, world leaders, wars (notably the first Gulf War), military personnel, and key moments of the civil rights movement and the riots it sparked. Brack also covered Watergate for TIME in 1974. He has covered ten presidential administrations, from JFK to Obama. Brack’s photos have appeared in TIME, NEWSWEEK, and LIFE, where Brack averaged a picture a week for twenty-three years.

Presidential Picture Stories: Behind the Cameras at the White House delivers a wonderful collection of historical photos from an assortment of White House photographers that includes everyone from Woodrow Wilson to the present. And of course, each picture has a story and Brack does an excellent job telling each of these stories behind the pictures, the presidents, and the photographers themselves.If you love history and photography, don’t miss this one.

*Received this book free from Goodreads in exchange for an honest review.

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5.0 out of 5 stars

A peek behind the curtain for decades in the White House!, December 16, 2013

By Benjamin KleberSee all my reviews

(REAL NAME) This review is from: Presidential Picture Stories (Hardcover)

Story after story give unusual glimpses into the history of press photography at the White House, from behind-the-scenes tales to little personal moments that never made it into the news. If you like knowing what went on over dozens of years that shaped the relationships between the United States Presidents and the news photographers that gave us our daily views of the White House, and delight from sharing in more intimate storytelling, you will love this book.

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